Tools for perfect Double Dip flowers

Olga Murasev— 09 July 2017 —

It is no secret that best results are achieved with proper professional face painting tools, which will allow you to master the technique much faster and easier. In this article, you’ll find out what are the best tools for perfect double dip flowers.

Double dip is a face and body painting technique where the artist creates petals with a brush loaded with one base color and then adds another color to the brush tip.

This technique always creates a WOW effect when your customers see you using it, especially when you make a beautiful cluster of flowers, fast! Luckily, this technique is relatively simple to achieve but quite requiring in tools. But once you know what are the right ones to use, you can nail it easily!

 

For painting double dip petals you will need:

  • #6 round brush
  • base color (usually white)
  • tip color (for double dip) or two tip colors (for triple dip)

Brushes

Number 6 round brush is the best size for creating bold pretty flowers. It is also important that the bristles are relatively short, the brush shape is bolder and the texture is firmer comparatively to the other round brushes used for linework.

Perfect Double Dip - Loew Cornell Brushes

I personally like the Loew Cornell 3000C #6 brush. I had it for 5 years and it is still one of my favorite brushes in entire kit. But unfortunately Loew Cornell discontinued this series of brushes, so it might be difficult to find one in face painting shops.

However, you may try to use the Loew Cornell 795 series #6 brush too. It is a bit softer than the 3000C brush and requires more tenderness when pressing on it, because if you press it too hard the bristles can split or slide, but is still a great one for double dip. Both of these brushes work well for creating any shape of petals, from long to bold and heart-shaped.

Different types of flowers in Double dip technique

There are also a few of the special “flora” brushes on the market, specially designed for double dip petals. I call these “lazy” brushes because no matter how you’ll press on it, you’ll still get the same shape of a petal. The good thing about it is that you can do great flowers fast, while the bad thing is that you won’t have the possibility to create various shapes of petals.

Types of Double dip petals with different brushes
Tip: Want to learn more about professional face painting tools? Check out the “How to choose the best sponge?” blog post.

Paints

The main color used for double dip is white, my experience shows that a bright waxy white will work the best way for this technique, so just choose any of these brands: Cameleon, Wolfe, Diamond FX, Kryvaline, Face Paints Australia.

The center of your flower will differ depending on the color that you will choose to dip the tip of your brush into. Pinks in all their shade variety will be the most popular color used of course. I personally like vibrant dark pink for the centers of my flowers. My favorites are Superstar Magenta, Cameleon Bollywood Pink and Global Magenta.

I’ve also seen some people loading their brush in a whatever color and then dipping the tip into white. In my opinion, this combination doesn’t look as pretty as the one described above.
First, all flowers have a depression in the center where petals are connecting and that’s the same effect that you recreate by having a darker color on the brush tip.
Second, when white is applied on top of a darker color, it loses its vibrancy because of mixing with it.
So, my experience shows that the best way to make beautiful double dip petals is to use white (or another light color) as a base and a darker color on the tip.

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Let me know in the comments below what are your favorite tools for Double dip and why? 👇

 — Olga Murasev

  • Jon Facepaintstuff

    I love the new-ish Mark Reid brush from Mehron for double dipping. It is all in the name; the Lily brush!

  • Lynne Ethier

    I still sometimes use the Mark Reid #6, but now i love the paint pal petal brush! beautiful flowers everytime!
    Thank you again for sharing your knowledge and details about the double/triple dipping flowers! Great info!. Lynne 🙂

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